Ms. Ivy Chan: Migration and the Collecting of Chinese Art in Hong Kong in the 20th Century

Date: 19 December 2017
Time: 4:30 – 6:00 pm
Venue: Room 4.36 Run Run Shaw Tower

In the mid-20th century, migrants from mainland China brought an influx of Chinese artworks, as well as their expertise on the subject, to the British colony of Hong Kong. Here mainland Chinese and local Hong Kong collectors encountered foreign connoisseurs (mostly from Britain, France, America and Japan) and built up significant collections of Chinese art under this multicultural environment. Through reconstructing the biographical accounts of four representative collectors who were active during the 1950s to 1990s – E. T. Chow (1910-1980), Low Chuck-Tiew (1911-1993), Dr Ip Yee (1919-1984) and  … (Please click on the image to read more)

Dr. Stacey Pierson: Dining, Diplomacy and Decoration: Chinese Porcelain in European Court Collections, 1500-1800

Date: 8 November 2017
Time: 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Venue: Room 4.34 Run Run Shaw Tower

In the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, European courts were an important location for the consumption and distribution of Chinese porcelain. Collections such as those in Dresden, the Netherlands and at Versailles are well known but what has not been explored before is the significant impact Chinese porcelain had on political, economic and cultural life in the courts of Europe for several hundred years. Chinese porcelains were consumed by courts from an early date and were acquired actively through gifts, exchange and trade, becoming a notable addition to European regal material culture… (Please click on the image to read more)

Prof. Greg Thomas: Craftsmanship and Display in France’s Chinese Museum

Date: 31 October 2017
Time: 4:30 – 6:00 pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

Empress Eugénie created the Chinese Museum in the palace of Fontainebleau to display Chinese art objects looted by French officers at the palace of Yuanming Yuan in 1860. This talk analyzes the museum display to see how it evaluated and interpreted the Chinese religious and material culture contained in the museum’s collection. By focusing on the museum’s décor, it shows in particular how French craftsmen created ornament and framing devices that paid homage to Chinese craftsmanship while conveying parallels between French and Chinese imperial cultures.

Dr. Ellen Huang: Eighteenth-Century Jingdezhen Porcelain as Meta-Chinoiserie

Date: 18 April 2017
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Venue: Room 4.34 Run Run Shaw Tower

Porcelain has long been recognized in scholarship as a significant object of exchange and encounter, with the word “chinaware” denoting porcelain’s crucial role in the shaping of European conceptions of China. This presentation builds upon such important studies by considering porcelain’s global impact not through English-language sources, but through the perspective of Qing Chinese imperial sources and contexts.

This talk focuses on the emergence of a new color palette featuring opaque pastel colors, commonly known as famille rose… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Michelle McCoy: A Sky with No Frontier: Figure, Schema, and Movement in the Astral Culture of China and Inner Asia, ca. 900-1200

Date: 12 April 2017
Time: 4:30 – 6:00 pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

The tenth to thirteenth centuries in what is now China witnessed the heyday of traditional Chinese astronomy, the transmission of new astral concepts and forms from afar, and the rise of influential astral deity cults. This talk examines the visual and material dimensions of this “astral turn” in transregional and transcultural perspective. We travel between the central Chinese plains, the northern steppe, and the northwestern desert, from the last days of the great Tang dynasty (618-907) to the multicentered age of the Song (960-1279) and its non-Han rivals, the Khitan Liao (907-1125) and Tangut Xixia (1038-1227)… (Please click on the image to read more)

Dr. Susan Whitfield: Trade in the Tarim? Evidence from the Material Culture of the Silk Road

Date: 10 April 2017
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Venue: Room 4.34 Run Run Shaw Tower

The existence of sustained inter-regional trade in Central Asia in the first millennium is not particularly visible in textual sources and its extent, especially its economic impact, remains largely unexplored. But there are clear manifestations in both the material and textual sources of the interregional movement and development of religions, arts, and technologies in this period. Trade in prestige goods, the so-called Silk Road, involving regular movements of peoples and goods and the creation of surplus wealth, has long been accepted as a significant factor by many although still questioned by some… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Sophia Powers: Performance, Temporality, Feminism and Death: Contemporary Indian Photography through the Lens of Sheba Chhachhi

Date: 27 March 2017
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Venue: Room 4.34 Run Run Shaw Tower

This talk explores three of the leading Indian contemporary artist Sheba Chhachhi’s earliest photographic projects: images of the anti-dowry women’s protest movement in Delhi, her subsequent series of so-called “staged portraits” of the movement’s protagonists, and her collaboration with members of the sadhu, or female Hindu renunciate community. I examine each project with special attention to the issue of temporality and argue that Chhachhi’s photographic practice both depends upon and powerfully expresses, modes of alternative temporality that are distinct from the journalistic paradigms within which her work first evolved … (Please click on the image to read more)

Dr. Vivian Kuang Sheng: Yin Xiuzhen’s Fabrication of ‘Home’: A Legacy of Domestic ‘Preservation’

Date: 22 March 2017
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

This paper considers a series of artworks made by the Chinese artist Yin Xiuzhen since the mid-1990s. The majority of Yin’s works are constructed from intimate and familiar everyday materials, second-hand clothes in particular. Through her creative and manifold acts of placing, sewing, knitting and packing, Yin reveals living stories and human emotions concealed in seemingly trivial and unremarkable household items, investigating the drastic changes to people’s lives in mainland China as well as in other parts of the world over the past two decades, especially in consideration of rapid urbanization and the … (Please click on the image to read more)

Dr. Brianne Cohen: Preventive Publics: The Burning Car in Thomas Hirschhorn’s Installations

Date: 21 March 2017
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Venue: Room 4.04 Run Run Shaw Tower

This talk unpacks issues of publicity and the public sphere in the oeuvre of Swiss artist Thomas Hirschhorn, whose practiceh as been controversial for its construction of temporary “cultural centers” in lowerincome, immigrant-populated suburbs in Europe. What are the ethics behind these neighborhood installations? On a most basic level, his socially oriented pieces work to highlight the violence behind signifiers in the mass media such as the burning car clip, a reductive image that has served to stigmatize and incite fears against “foreigners” on the continent. More critically, these installations model and instantiate preventive publics … (Please click on the image to read more)

Dr. Daniella Cecutti: Collecting, Collectors and the Market for Islamic Art from the 19th to the 20th Century

daniella-cecutti-poster-1Date: 24 January 2017
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Venue: Room 4.04 Run Run Shaw Tower

Daniela Cecutti is a graduate of the University of Udine (Italy), where she studied art history and specialised in non-European art. She obtained her PhD in 2013, after defending her dissertation on collections of Islamic arms and armour, entitled: “Collecting and the market for Islamic Art from the 19th to the 20th Century; Italy and the International context”. She has collaborared with several Italian museums; has published scholarly articles and essay in academic journals and exhibition catalogues, and has published a monograph on the subject of Italian collecting of Islamic art … (Please click on the image to read more)