Ms. Ruby Leung: Ke Jiusi (1290-1343) and Ink Bamboo Painting in the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

RLposter1Date: 26 February 2014
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

In the Yuan dynasty, ink bamboo painting was already a well-established genre. While it is a short-live dynasty, we find a great increase in references to artists who painted bamboo. Ke Jiusi is one of the most famous bamboo painters who has left behind a number paintings and texts on bamboo. My analysis of the activities of Ke Jiusi and his circle of bamboo painters, indicate that ink bamboo painting in the Yuan dynasty played a role different to what established scholarship has suggested in at least two ways… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Alice Wong: Before the Order of Art in Republican China

130930 seminar wongDate: 30 September 2013
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 4.04 Run Run Shaw Tower

My thesis focuses on early Republican art in China and on a group of student artists returning from Japan in the 1910s and 1920s. These artists received training in western style painting, which at this time offered a range of instructions based on European tradition. One of the areas of interest with this group is how they applied their training to areas that were not determined by media or style, but to areas such as design and photography… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Tsang Sholan Kai: Fit Wives and Mothers of Men: Winslow Homer and the Women of Cullercoats

120503 seminar tsangDate: 3 May 2012
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

In 1881 the American artist Winslow Homer embarked on a twenty-month stay in a small fishing village called Cullercoats on the northeast coast of England. During this time his work changed irrevocably in both style and subject matter and he began to depict, almost exclusively, the local fishwives. This seminar will be an exploration of Homer’s depictions of women during this period… (Please click on the image to read more)

Mr. Yang Qingkang: From Paris to Chengdu: War and the Transformation of Pang Xunqin’s Painting

YangQingkang_seminarDate: 24 April 2012
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

Pang Xunqin (龐薰琹, 1906-1985), who was one of the founders of the Central Institute of Arts and Crafts, is well known for his achievements as a researcher and educator in the field of arts and crafts. However, his other role in 20th century Chinese art history, which may be of equal or greater importance and has, until now, been somewhat neglected, is that of a modern painter. This seminar examines the “sinicization” elements in Pang’s wartime paintings (1937-1945)… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Kwok Yin Ning Elaine : The Reception of Chinese Art from the Early 17th Century to 1767

Elaine_seminar_2012Date: 12 April 2012
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

This seminar examines the European reception of Chinese landscape painting as expressed in English language texts. By analyzing how the major early English writings of various kinds described, interpreted, and theorized Chinese landscape painting, I aim to explore the historical pattern of how Europeans understood Chinese landscape painting in the course of cross-cultural interaction in the 17th and the 18th centuries …(Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Lee Yoon Yung: The Paradox of Paintings in Korea under Japanese Colonial Rule (1905-1945)

Yoon_Lee_seminarDate: 24 November 2010
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

At the end of the 19th century, Japan emerged as a dominant nation in Asia who expended their territory with a succession of military campaigns. In order to legitimize its colonial rule, Japan used two different, and sometimes contradictory approaches. Japan identified itself with the “advanced” West and treated neighboring Asian countries as an inferior other. On the other hand, Japan promoted a unified Asia-as-one as an alternative to Western imperialism … (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Fung Nok Kan Nicole: Christian Literati in Ming China: Wu Li (1632-1718)

Nicole_Fung_seminarDate: 17 November 2010
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

Born in the late Ming, Wu Li (1632-1718) was trained as a literatus and skilled in the Confucian classics, poetry, music, and painting. The training enabled him to join a broader social network that connected literati elite across the country. Amongst Wu Li’s network of friends was Xu Zhijian, a scholar official who was criticized and dismissed in an anti-Christian campaign. He was rehabilitated in 1669 and Wu Li traveled with him to Beijing the year after. The 1670s was when we see Wu Li showed an interest in Christianity … (Please click on the image to read more)

Mr. Li Chun Tung: Empowered by the Cosmos: The Yonglegong and Yuan Dynasty Politics

Li_Chuntung_seminar

Date: 29 April 2010
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

In 1244 the former Lüzhuci or the Shrine of Taoist Patriarch Lü Dongbin (798-?) in Yongle county was burned down and by 1262 was reconstructed on a grander scale. During the eighteen years that it took to rebuild the temple, the Mongols were consolidating their power in northern China. The reconstruction of the temple, commonly known as Yonglegong, is a testimony to the friendship between the Quanzhen Taoist order and the rising Mongol polity. The mural paintings in the Sanqing Dian (Hall of Three Purities) were completed by 1325 … (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Wong Sau Mui Alice: Food as Spectacle in Impressionist Painting

Alice_Wong

Date: 10 December 2009
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

Between the 1860s and the 1880s, Haussmannization transformed Paris into a “modern” city with a circulation system encompassing an extensive railroad network and wide boulevards. As part of this urban redevelopment, Les Halles, the central market initiated by Napoleon in 1811, was also expanded, eventually completed in the 1880s. This new central market, facilitated by the efficient communication network that distributed food provisions in Paris, simultaneously accelerated the speed and scale of food consumption … (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Leung Pui Yi: Exploring Tings (Pavilions) in the Landscape Paintings of Ni Zan (1301-1374)

Date: 12 December 2008Leung_Puiyi_seminar
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 238 Main Building

In China, the simple architectural structure ting has existed since as early as the Warring States period (475-221BCE). Intially these rustics bulidings were designed as outposts along frontier regions. By the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368), the ting had become a popular theme in Chinese literature and a significant subject included in Chinese landscape paintings. This seminar investigates the depictions of tings by Ni Zan, one of the Yuan dyansty’s most important masters … (Please click on the image to read more)