Ms. Leung Ge Yau Candy: Some Insights on the Genre of Bird Painting in the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Date: 30 November 2017
Time: 4:30pm
Venue: Room 10.28 Run Run Shaw Tower

The genre of bird painting became a well-established independent genre of practice in the Tang dynasty (618-907) and flourished in Song dynasty (960-1279) with the imperial support. The painters of Song Academy executed works rich in colour with detailed brushwork, and such meticulous style of painting formed the dominant mode of representation for bird paintings prior to the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368). In the Yuan dynasty, the genre of bird painting underwent significant changes in various aspects. One of the major developments was the rise of the sub-genre of ink monochrome bird painting, and Wang Yuan 王淵 (act. c. 1300-1360) … (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Shanshan Chen: The Imagery of Rehe in the Macartney Embassy to China

161109-seminar-chenDate: 9 November 2016
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 10.28 Run Run Shaw Tower

Located far northeast of Beijing, Rehe 熱河 (Chengde) was the summer capital of the Qing empire, consisting of the famous Bishu Shanzhuang 避暑山莊 (Mountain Resort Villa) and Waibamiao 外八廟 (Eight Outer Temples). Built by the Kangxi (1654-1722) and Qianlong (1711-1799) emperors, it was a large complex of imperial gardens, palaces, and temples where the emperors celebrated birthdays and received foreign visitors. This is where the historic encounter between Lord Macartney and the Qianlong emperor took place on September 14, 1793…(Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Lori Luo: The Chinoiserie Garden in Britain c.1730 – c.1850

161026-seminar-luoDate: 26 October 2016
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 10.28 Run Run Shaw Tower

Among the many artistic interactions between Britain and China in the 18th and 19th centuries, landscape gardening was one of the most common and consistent areas displaying western curiosity about the remote civilization. By adapting elements from the foreign culture of China, British patrons and designers took the new style of garden design as a way to demonstrate their own social and cultural beliefs and identity. This talk will examine three Chinoiserie gardens in different periods, focusing on how the Chinese style was interpreted and how various Chinese elements embodied specific meanings… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Heidi Wu: Portrait of an Empress: The Empress Dowager Cixi and the Formation of Imperial Identity in the Late Qing Dynasty

Date: 13 June 2016
Time: 12:30pm
Venue: Room 10.28 Run Run Shaw Tower

Ms. Janet Wong: The 19th-Century Display of Chinese Art in the Musée Guimet

Janet Seminar Poster finalDate: 9 October 2015
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 4.04 Run Run Shaw Tower

In the late 19th century when China was increasingly exposed to European travelers due to the opening of ports and the development of transportation, a number of bourgeois men formed collections of Chinese art in France. One of them was Emile Guimet (1836-1918) who formed his collection in the 1870s and founded the well-known Musée Guimet (Guimet Museum) in Paris in 1889… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Alice Wong: Portraits and Regulations in Early Republican Shanghai Art

Alice Wong talk 2015Date: 17 March 2015
Time: 5:30 – 7:00pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

This presentation looks at the growing visibility of “portraits” in Shanghai and argues that it was tied to the changes in regulatory acts in the 1910s and the 1920s. It was during this time when authorities began to use photographs in official documents such as passport and license as an enhanced form of control and surveillance. The manipulation of their uses in other forms and spaces reveals how the portrait became a familiar form at all levels… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Ruby Leung: Li 理 (Universal Principle), Li Kan 李衎 (1245-1320) and Yuan-Dynasty (1271-1368) Bamboo Painting

141110 seminar leungDate: 10 November 2014
Time: 5pm
Venue: Room 10.28 Run Run Shaw Tower

In the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368), the number of artists who painted the subject bamboo greatly increased. Li Kan 李衎 (1245-1320), Gao Kegong 高克恭 (1248-1310), and Zhao Mengfu 趙孟頫 (1254-1322) were all famous for their bamboo paintings. My research suggests that in the earlier Song, bamboo was interpreted as possessing the qualities of a scholarly gentleman. The famous philosopher Zhu Xi 朱熹 (1130-1200), shifted focus in commentaries on bamboo so that it became a means to understand li, the universal principle that governs all in the cosmos… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Grace Cheng: Fashioning Artistic Identity in 17th Century Paris: The Le Nain Brothers’ L’Atelier in Context

141030 seminar chengDate: 30 October 2014
Time: 5pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

The brothers Le Nain have long been celebrated as among the most original and accomplished painters working in mid 17th Century Paris. But their style of painting, distinctive studio practice, and focus on scenes of everyday life put them at odds with the academic norms which were coming to dominate French painting, rendering them socially and professionally illegible. The modern reputation of the Le Nain owes more to their 19th Century rediscovery as ‘painters of genre’ than to the actuality of their aspirations and practice…(Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Leung Ge Yau Candy: Representing the Literatus Self in the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

140912 seminar leungDate: 12 September 2014
Time: 4:30pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

Existing portraits of scholar-officials prior to the Song dynasty suggest that many were commissioned for the purpose of commemoration. The imperial court was a great patron for portraiture that was designed to serve a public function and usually this was in the format of a “portrait sequence” in which exalted officials were lined up to receive and give homage. Detailed facial description was not important in early portraiture and painters only started to paint faces with a greater tendency towards naturalism, which I define as the putative agreement between the appearances of the painting and the actual sitter, in the Five Dynasties (907-979)… (Please click on the image to read more)

Ms. Ruby Leung: Ke Jiusi (1290-1343) and Ink Bamboo Painting in the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

RLposter1Date: 26 February 2014
Time: 5:00pm
Venue: Room 7.58 Run Run Shaw Tower

In the Yuan dynasty, ink bamboo painting was already a well-established genre. While it is a short-live dynasty, we find a great increase in references to artists who painted bamboo. Ke Jiusi is one of the most famous bamboo painters who has left behind a number paintings and texts on bamboo. My analysis of the activities of Ke Jiusi and his circle of bamboo painters, indicate that ink bamboo painting in the Yuan dynasty played a role different to what established scholarship has suggested in at least two ways… (Please click on the image to read more)